Monday, November 16, 2009

IJEE Special Issue > Mobile Technologies In Engineering Education > I I

Mobile Technologies In Engineering Education (II)  / International Journal Of Engineering Education  / Volume 24 / Number 1 / 2008



Guest Editors  >  Kok Kiong Tan  / National University of Singapore ; Ahmad Ibrahim / RCC Institute of Technology, Toronto

Table Of Contents

M. S. Wald / Editorial

K. K. Tan and A. Ibrahim  / Guest Editorial /

A. A. Economides and N. Nikolaou  / Evaluation of Handheld Devices for Mobile Learning


Many educational organizations have started using handheld devices for learning. The aim of this paper is to identify the current status of handheld devices and their appropriateness for mobile learning. First, this presents a framework for evaluating handheld devices in relation to mobile learning. Then, it evaluates current handheld devices using the evaluation criteria and records of the state of the art. Finally, it identifies the strengths and weaknesses of current handheld devices and suggests technical specifications appropriate for mobile learning.

Source

[http://www.engineeringpathway.com/ep/learning_resource/summary/?id=C8898ABA-1B46-4FA4-A350-D252BE583CEC]

A. Istanbullu  / Mobilim: Mobile Learning Management Framework System for Engineering Education

This paper introduces the implementation of a Mobile Learning Management System (Mobilim) designed for m-learning environments. The Mobilim system has been developed to provide educational contents through the Internet using mobile phones for engineering educators and students. System features have been evaluated by instructors and students.

The system evaluation shows that Mobilim is a useful m-learning environment. Initial results of the system are encouraging for the further development of the system. In addition, the use of open software for the development of this system makes it cost-effective. Mobilim pages can be accessed by mobile phones that have the XHTML browser feature.

Source


S. Aydin and H. Kaptan  / Computer-Aided Mobile GPS Education Set

This paper describes the design of a computer-aided educational mobile GPS (Global Positioning System) set. By means of this set, use of a GPS receiver and GPS connectivity with mobile devices can be taught more effectively. In addition, students can develop related GPS applications supported by mobile technologies like GSM, GPRS or Bluetooth. This mobile education set enables students to send location information via SMS or compare GPS receivers' data in different locations via GPRS etc.

This set consists of a GPS module, an antenna, an 8051-based microcontroller, a monitor ROM for embedded applications, a portable computer and an application software that communicates with the hardware. Educational materials prepared by Macromedia Flash and Java Programming Language have been added to the GPS education set in order to design an efficient student-oriented system.

Source


 L. Petropoulakis and F. Flood / Interactive Student Engagement Using Wireless Handheld Devices

This paper presents an initial design of a pilot wireless Classroom Communication System (CCS) used for continuous and interactive engagement of students aiming at enhancing student critical thinking, extending attention span and enabling better student assessment. The system was designed mostly for engineering students and is intended to be used in lectures, tutorials or laboratories.

The design should ultimately enable students to use, amongst other software, standard engineering packages such as MATLAB, PSpice, or Electronic WorkBench to construct designs, perform simulations and obtain answers to design problems using just wireless handheld pocket PCs. The system is based upon a CSCW system originally designed to be used anytime during lectures or tutorials and may involve the guidance and personal intervention of a lecturer or tutor. It is intended to support several modes and allows group or one-to-one personal tutoring. The system may also serve as a means of assessing individual student performance and in assisting lecturing staff with other tasks.

Source

J. Ma GutieÂrrez, S. OtoÂn, L. JimeÂnez and R. Barchino / M-learning Enhancement Using 3D Worlds

As mobile-learning evolves, it needs an increasing amount of information to be displayed in the device screens. Also, to develop applications to be currently used by a wide range of users, the target devices must be the mobile phones rather than PDA or bigger devices. As the phone screen is very small and many different contents must be shown, a new approach is needed to join both requirements.

This paper presents a proposal for the use of 3D worlds to enhance the interface of mobile-learning applications. Some specific test results are shown for every component available to construct 3D worlds. The result is an expanded interface where more information is displayed in the same space related to the subjective 3D perspective.

Source


K. K. Tan, E. B. Tay, K. C. Ong and C-Y. Leong / Mobile Real-Time Feedback System for Education

The development of mobile real-time feedback systems is discussed along with their application to scenarios in education when some feedback from students is necessary to better direct the delivery of specific teaching materials, lesson planning or the use of an appropriate teaching approach. The requirements to be met by one such system are considered along with implementation and the field data collected from a variety of application scenarios.

Source


J. Z. Zhang, M. Teslow and P. Sander  / An `Engineering-Health Science' Interdisciplinary Approach to Promoting Mobile Technology for Multidisciplinary Applications

This is a progress report on our ongoing interdisciplinary project to promote mobile technology for multidisciplinary applications. The project consists of collaborative efforts between engineering and health science faculty and students in using mobile techniques to collect, transmit, analyse and store health data. Main techniques of wireless data acquisition and transmission, as well as key issues such as privacy and data security are addressed through joint course instruction sessions and laboratory experiments.

The project is initiated via a Health Science Health Care Informatics course and an engineering Wireless Communications and Systems course. Health science students are to learn engineering techniques of effective use of wireless communications systems, while engineering students are to gain knowledge of applications in health sciences. Upon successful implementation and further improvement, this model can be further expanded into other areas such as natural sciences and business administration where the same concepts can be applied using different datasets. The interdisciplinary approach of using mobile technology will result in a revolutionary and exciting learning environment with truly multidisciplinary applications.

Source


A. Tretiakov and Kinshuk  / Towards Designing m-Learning Systems for Maximal Likelihood of Acceptance

So far, in the field of m-learning the issue of technology acceptance has been largely overlooked. We apply the Technology Acceptance Model to consider the requirements for a generic m-learning system that would maximize the likelihood of its acceptance, and conclude that such a system should rely on the existing infrastructure and mobile device ownership.

We back this conclusion by conducting a survey on m-learning acceptance targeted at educators and by developing a system prototype and evaluating it in a simulated classroom environment. The results speak in favour of introducing low cost, low maintenance m-learning systems targeting average, budget conscious educational institutions, with SMS technology being the most appropriate technology under present conditions.

[http://www.engineeringpathway.com/ep/learning_resource/summary/?id=E56983A0-54D3-4DD4-B46C-8BF8D921EC70]

 S. Palmer and W. Hall  / Application of Podcasting in Online Engineering Education

Applications of mobile technologies for engineering education can be found in the literature, but, many of the reported applications are aimed at the online (wirelessly), on-campus, synchronous and proximal use of mobile technologies. Mobile technologies in engineering education can encompass more than the proximal teaching and learning environmentÐthey can be offline, asynchronous and at a distance from the classroom. This paper reports on the initial application of `podcasting' in a wholly online engineering study unit. It presents the rationale for, technical development details of, and, limited evaluation of this initial podcasting trial.

Source

[http://www.engineeringpathway.com/ep/learning_resource/summary/?id=75EE64C0-BBC0-4BED-A6BA-C7BD8399A82B]

M. Milrad and M. H. Jackson  / Designing and Implementing Educational Mobile Services in Univeraity Classrooms Using Smart Phones and Cellular Networks

In this paper we report the results of our ongoing activities regarding the use of smart phones and mobile services in university classrooms at VaÈxjoÈ University. The purpose of these trials was to explore and identify which content and services could be delivered to the smart phones in order to support learning and communication in the context of university studies. The activities were conducted within the MUSIS (MUlticasting Services and Information in Sweden) project where 41 students from two different courses at VaÈxjoÈ University participated during a period of three months. Generally, the services integrated transparently into students' previous experience with mobile phones.

Students generally perceived the services as useful to learning; interestingly, attitudes were more positive if the instructor adapted pedagogical style and instructional material to take advantage of the distinctive capabilities of multicasting. To illustrate, we describe a number of educational mobile services we have designed and implemented at VaÈxjoÈ University. We conclude with recommendations for increasing the potential for successful implementation of multicasting mobile services in higher education, including the importance of usability, institutional support and tailored educational content."

Source

[http://www.engineeringpathway.com/ep/learning_resource/summary/?id=B731346F-BDAD-40ED-A9C2-7BEF548BF6D7]

B. Ramaswamy, Y. Chen and K. L. Moore / Omni-directional Robotic Wheel: A Mobile Real-Time Control Systems Laboratory

A mobile laboratory was developed for students of the ECE5320 Mechatronics and ECE7750 Distributed Control Systems courses at Utah State University. A serial server was connected to the microcontroller of a stand-alone omni-directional robotic wheel assembly. This enabled communication between the wheel and any remote computer, via a wired or wireless Internet connection. A telepresence control system and a prototype networked control system (NCS) were developed and tested. This system was suitably modified to accommodate the needs of the course laboratories, thereby enabling students to design, debug and test their laboratory project in real-time from the comfort of their own locations.

Source

[http://www.engineeringpathway.com/ep/learning_resource/summary/?id=25955424-B3CE-45EB-AFFD-FE8F1866202A]

S. Palmer and W. Hall  / Application of Podcasting in Online Engineering Education

Applications of mobile technologies for engineering education can be found in the literature, but, many of the reported applications are aimed at the online (wirelessly), on-campus, synchronous and proximal use of mobile technologies. Mobile technologies in engineering education can encompass more than the proximal teaching and learning environment they can be offline, asynchronous and at a distance from the classroom. This paper reports on the initial application of `podcasting' in a wholly online engineering study unit. It presents the rationale for, technical development details of, and, limited evaluation of this initial podcasting trial.

Source


W-H. Wu and W-F. Chen  /  Effect of Varied Types of Instructional Delivery Media and Messages for Engineering Education: an Experimental Study

In a Digital Signal Processing course, students received two different types of instructional delivery messages (online text only and text along with a simulation tool: MATLAB) via two different types of instructional delivery media (desktop PC and personal digital assistant (PDA)). An experimental study was designed to investigate the potential main effects and the interaction of these two independent variables: instructional delivery message and instructional delivery media. Results showed that students expressed a significantly higher intention to learn in a desktop PC environment than in a PDA environment (F[1,21]=17.31, p < 0.05). We also found that students who used a MATLAB simulation tool performed significantly better on an achievement test than those who did not use it (F[1,21]=10.96, p < 0.05).


J. Chen, Kinshuk, N-S. Chen and T. Lin  / Student Profile Transformation between Desktop PCs and Mobile Phones

To meet the learning needs of various types of students, various adaptivity features are being implemented in computer-based learning systems to personalize education for every student. Recent developments in mobile technology have made the computer-based learning systems also accessible through mobile devices such as mobile phones. It is, therefore, becoming necessary that the students can also receive personalized learning through mobile devices. This research looks into various student preferences on different devices and how these preferences change when students move from one device to another to access learning content. Two surveys have been conducted in this research to investigate difference in various preferences of students while using personal computers (PCs) and mobile phones.


A prototype computer-based educational system, accessible both from PCs and mobile phones, was also developed for this study to provide real experience of both type of interaction to the participants of the surveys. A student profile template is then designed on the basis of survey findings, which resulted in the student profile transformation framework. The framework is the first step towards content development guidelines to serve students on different types of learning devices.

Source

[http://www.engineeringpathway.com/ep/learning_resource/summary/?id=8E125A3D-404C-48C5-AE16-5E9B2B579C80]

R. Chompu-Inwai and T. L. Doolen  / The Impact of Mobile Wireless Technology on Student Attitudes in Higher Education Classrooms

Our research employed both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies to explore the impact of mobile wireless technology (MWT) on student attitudes. This study provided empirical evidence that in higher education classrooms where MWT was used on a regular basis, the robustness of supporting infrastructure played an important role in positively or negatively influencing student attitudes.

In classrooms where MWT devices were used for special purpose applications, perceived MWT value, as well as the relationship between MWT usage and grades, was found to impact on student attitudes. This study also found that previous MWT experience did not necessarily impact on student attitudes towards MWT and MWT usage.

See Also


M. Onat / Developing a PC- and SMS-mC-based Stepper Motor Drive Set

This paper describes a PC- and SMS-mC-based Stepper Motor Drive set developed at Marmara University for use in graduate and undergraduate studies. The drive set presents an environment utilizing GSM service, in which students implement stepper motor real-time driving applications, readily get familiar with short message service SMS AT commands with an interface program and learn driving fundamentals through an animation program. Additionally, they can develop and implement different driving algorithms for the stepper motors in this environment.

Source

[http://www.engineeringpathway.com/ep/learning_resource/summary/?id=2C8156B4-27FD-4DC1-9A84-D88220BE8AE3]

Full Text Available / Open Access And/Or Access To Subscribers Only ?

See Also

IJEE Special Issue > Mobile Technologies In Engineering Education > I

[http://mobile-libraries.blogspot.com/2009/11/ijee-special-issue-mobile-technologies.html

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